CLOUD GEL COMPETITION ANALYSIS

Optical Shutter Technology /
Products and Applications
Installed Cost of Product, $/sq ft
Reduces Solar Glare
Reduces Solar Heat Gains
Provides privacy at will
Operates Automatically w/o Electricity
Development Stage
CLOUD GEL/
Skylights, Solar Heating, Sunrooms, Non-View Windows, Greenhouses
5 ( 35 €/sqM )
100%
90%
No
Yes
Ready for market
Electrochromic/
Car Rear View Mirrors, Airplane Windows
50
80%
40%
Yes
No
Rear-view mirror product introduced to market in 1996
Liquid Crystal /
Windows
70
50%
40%
Yes
No
Introduced and withdrawn from architectural markets
Suspended Particle/
Windows, Eyewear, Sunroofs, Skylights, and Car Mirrors.
50
60%
40%
Yes
No
Development stage IPO & licensing agreements signed over 10 years ago, no sales, aging problems
Mechanical Shades, Venetian Blinds /
Windows, Greenhouses
2 - 15
50 - 100%
30-100%
Yes
No
Significant market penetration
Whitewashing /
Greenhouses
0.50
80%
70%
N/A
No
Significant market penetration
Metallized Plastic Film/
Windows
1.50-3.50
70%
30%
No
No
Some commercial market penetration



A COMPARISON OF ELECTROCHROMIC AND CLOUD GEL TECHNOLOGIES

In 1971, when Day Chahroudi spent a year in the Library of Congress researching physical phenomena and technologies that could be used for optical shutter and transparent insulation glazings, (and invented Low-E and Cloud Gel), he came across the developmental military display technology that is now used for electrochromics. He did not invent the electrochromic glazing technology itself, just the new use for it. (see U.S. patent 4,307,942; filed in 1980)

In 1978 DOE (then ERDA) paid Suntek $50,000 to publish the results of his optical shutter research, excluding Cloud Gel. The report recommended electrochromic technology as low risk and low reward. LBL National Window Laboratory then declared electrochromics a national research priority, convening a meeting of research directors from all the U.S. glass companies, and representatives from all the National Laboratories. Since then, over $600 million have been spent developing electrochromics. (Suntek developed and brought to market Low-E, the only commercial high tech glazing with $6 million.)

In 1978 Chahroudi called electrochromics "low reward" for energy markets because:

Since 1978, the laws of nature have not changed, unimpressed with $600 million of R&D. Electrochromics still address only the comparatively small, high priced privacy market, not the 7 billion square foot per year energy market that Chahroudi designed Cloud Gel's molecules for.